All-aluminum 6-inch PV PoleTop' Debuts at SolarPower 2004 in San Francisco

UniRac's new 6-inch PV PoleTop' is built around an innovative gimbal that offers continuous adjustability to arrays as large as 140 square feet.

UniRac's new 6-inch PV PoleTop' is built around an innovative gimbal that offers continuous adjustability to arrays as large as 140 square feet. With the upgrade, PV PoleTops become the first full line of poletop racks in the industry to offer the durability of all-aluminum components.


PV installers and other alternative energy professionals can scrutinize this latest innovation in PV mounting structures at SolarPower 2004 in San Francisco. Both an assembled array and a hands-on gimbal sample are on display at the UniRac booth, no. 18/19 in the Market Street Atrium.

The patent pending gimbal improves on fixed-increment tilt arrangements by facilitating any tilt angle from 0 to 60 degrees from the horizontal. An array is quicker than ever to install, and adjustment is easier, both initially and after installation.

The 6-inch PoleTop also retains the best features of its predecessor:

- SolarMount® HD (heavy duty) rails provide the strength to support an array of up to 1850 watts on a single pole.
- Stainless steel and zinc-plated fasteners will not corrode over time.
- The full array can be rotated on its pole at any time.
- UniRac provides Design Wind Pressure ratings specific to your entire installation, taking into account the type and number of PV modules in addition to the PV PoleTop model.

See our PV Poletop web page for additional information on the new 6-inch PV Poletop (Series 5004) and our other all-aluminum poletops.

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