Renewables on Track to be Scotland's Main Source of Power

"Renewables on their own are already producing more electricity than either coal or gas.

New figures have revealed Scots now receive most of their electricity from low carbon sources, with almost two-thirds of the country's power coming from renewables and nuclear.


Niall Stuart, Chief Executive of Scottish Renewables, said: "Scotland's power sector is becoming less dependent on fossil fuels every day, with almost two-thirds (64.2%) of electricity generated by low carbon sources - up from less than 60% on previous year's figures.

"Renewables on their own are already producing more electricity than either coal or gas.

"Despite a fall in hydro output, the 18% increase in power from wind ensured that renewables generated more electricity than ever before."

The Scottish Government has a target for the renewables sector to generate the equivalent of half of our annual demand for electricity by 2015. The figures published today show that renewables met the equivalent of more than 40% of our electricity needs in Scotland for the first time in 2012.

Mr Stuart concluded by highlighting that the sector is on track to meet its target of generating the equivalent of half of Scotland's total demand for power in 2015 and is set to become Scotland's main source of power:

"These figures show that we are on track not just to hit the Scottish Government's target, but also for renewables to become Scotland's main source of power in 2015."

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