Navy Adding Green to Haze-gray Arsenal

An experimental “Green Hornet” fighter jet that uses biofuel. The “Prius” warship running on a hybrid engine. The Navy is increasingly going green thanks largely to a desire to reduce its dependence on fossil fuels that come from hostile places in the world. The Navy, the Pentagon’s second-largest user of oil, also sees it as an expensive bill to pay as budgets get leaner. And in the San Diego region, the results are easy to see: Rooftops full of solar panels at San Diego naval bases. Electric carts. Biodiesel bulldozers. Even windmills off the coast on San Clemente Island. “The Navy is a complex animal, but in some areas of environmental protection, they are moving forward as fast as any agency,” said Michael Jasny of the Natural Resources Defense Council, which has long fought the Navy over the effect of military sonar on whales.

Comments (0)

This post does not have any comments. Be the first to leave a comment below.


Post A Comment

You must be logged in before you can post a comment. Login now.

Featured Product

Darfon G320 Microinverter

Darfon G320 Microinverter

The Darfon G320 is the microinverter solution for today's high-power solar modules. The G320 handles 60- and 72-cell modules up to 350W DC and outputs up to 300W AC. The G320's 3-phase configuration accommodates the electrical distribution systems of most commercial buildings and to reduce, if not eliminate, the need for expensive transformers. The G320 comes in four voltage/phase configurations, so it can be installed in residential, commercial or utility applications.