Solar News - New cheap, environment-friendly solar cell developed

In a breakthrough, scientists have developed a new low cost, efficient and environment-friendly solar cell that uses tin instead of the hazardous lead.
 
Researchers from Northwestern University are among the first to create a solar cell that uses a structure called perovskite, with tin as the light-absorbing material instead of lead.
 
"Exculding the use of lead is a quantum leap in the process of creating a very promising type of solar cell called a perovskite," said Mercouri G Kanatzidis, an inorganic chemist with expertise in dealing with tin.
 
"Tin is a very viable material, and we have shown that it works as an efficient solar cell," said Kanatzidis.
 
Lead perovskite has achieved 15 per cent efficiency and tin perovskite should be able to match - and possibly surpass - this level of efficiency, researchers said.
 
Perovskite solar cells are being touted as the "next big thing in photovoltaics" and have reenergised the field. 

 

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