Geothermal Leaders to Convene in Washington DC for Showcase

Building on this momentum, the Geothermal Energy Association's (GEA) U.S. and International Geothermal Showcase this March will highlight to Washington DC decision makers how leading geothermal nations are unlocking their geothermal potential.

36 countries launch world alliance for geothermal energy

Thirty-six countries gave the official start Monday to an initiative to promote geothermal energy in developing economies as a cleaner alternative to oil, gas and coal.

The Global Geothermal Alliance, launched on the sidelines of the UN climate talks in Le Bourget, aims at a sixfold increase in geothermal electricity production and a tripling of geothermal-derived heating by 2030.

At present, geothermal is growing modestly, at three to four percent per year, providing 12 gigawatts of electricity annually.

But this is just a fraction of its overall potential of 100 gigawatts, according to the industry. Only 24 out of 90 countries with geothermal potential actually use the resource.

The alliance said its members will seek to overcome "political uncertainty" about geothermal and strengthen the industry's skills base.

The Global Geothermal Alliance initiative was sketched out in September 2014 at a summit organised by UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon.

Members include countries on thermal "hotspots" in Africa, Southeast Asia and Latin America, ranging from Kenya and Tanzania to Malaysia, the Philippines and Guatemala.  Cont'd...

Researchers want oil and gas drillers to adopt geothermal technology

By Brooks Hays for UPI:  Researchers at the University of North Dakota believe geothermal energy production should be a significant part of America's future energy portfolio.

But to get the industry off the ground, proponents are looking to an industry not normally associated with renewable energy -- gas and oil drillers.

"Oil- and gas-producing sedimentary basins in Colorado, Illinois, Michigan, and North Dakota contain formation waters of a temperature that is adequate for geothermal power production," researchers wrote in their new study on the subject, published this week in the journal Geosphere.

Geothermal energy requires heat, and natural sources of heat lie deep within the ground. Gas and oil drillers have already built the infrastructure to access deep-lying natural resources. Of course, gas and oil drillers want gas and oil, not heat. But in their quest for gas and oil, they get heat nonetheless.  Cont'd...

Balls of DNA Could Fix Geothermal Energy's Biggest Problem

Shara Tonn for Wired.com:  Geothermal Power has the potential to be cheap, reliable, and abundant—running off the heat of the Earth 24 hours a day, seven days a week. That’s especially true thanks to a new generation of home-grown geothermal plants, which don’t run off the steam of natural hot springs and geysers. No need to find those hydrothermal gems; today, geothermal engineers are making their own reservoirs by drilling down into hot rock and pumping in water.

The catch? Engineers can’t see what’s happening underground. Drilling wells in just the right spot can be like playing golf blindfolded: Even if someone faces you in the right direction, you could still hit the ball way off the green. But tiny fragments of DNA dropped into the wells could soon help engineers follow the path of water underground, helping them sink their putts every time.

In a basic geothermal plant set-up, engineers actually have to drill two types of wells. The first kind, which goes down two or three miles, carries cold water down deep, where it fractures the hot rock and creates new paths for water to move. It’s kind of like fracking, but without the chemicals.  Cont'd...

Balls of DNA Could Fix Geothermal Energy's Biggest Problem

Shara Tonn for Wired.com:  Geothermal Power has the potential to be cheap, reliable, and abundant—running off the heat of the Earth 24 hours a day, seven days a week. That’s especially true thanks to a new generation of home-grown geothermal plants, which don’t run off the steam of natural hot springs and geysers. No need to find those hydrothermal gems; today, geothermal engineers are making their own reservoirs by drilling down into hot rock and pumping in water.

The catch? Engineers can’t see what’s happening underground. Drilling wells in just the right spot can be like playing golf blindfolded: Even if someone faces you in the right direction, you could still hit the ball way off the green. But tiny fragments of DNA dropped into the wells could soon help engineers follow the path of water underground, helping them sink their putts every time.

In a basic geothermal plant set-up, engineers actually have to drill two types of wells. The first kind, which goes down two or three miles, carries cold water down deep, where it fractures the hot rock and creates new paths for water to move. It’s kind of like fracking, but without the chemicals.  Cont'd...

After Years of Lying Dormant, the Geothermal Market is Ready to Take Off

Though the potential and power of geothermal energy is massive, setting up a large-scale plant to harness this energy is not an easy goal.

Early Bird Registration Deadline for GRC Annual Meeting is This Week

Save $100 for this premier geothermal energy event by registering before midnight on Sunday

Geothermal Resources Council Announces Scholarship Winners

$15,000 in Scholarship Awards will be presented at the 2015 GRC Annual Meeting

Forging new geothermal resources through research

U.S. Department of Energy project calls on University expertise in geologic modeling and geothermal exploration

Geothermal Awards Announced

Best and brightest of the global geothermal community will be honored at the 39th GRC Annual Meeting in Reno, Nevada, USA

International Geothermal Workshop Announced by GRC

The Geothermal Resources Council will present a two-day course in Jakarta before the Indonesian International Geothermal Convention & Exhibition

Geothermal Heating and Cooling

Geothermal heat pumps are ideal for use in buildings looking to reduce consumption to net zero.

GRC Annual Meeting & GEA Geothermal Energy Expo To Convene World's Largest Annual Geothermal Industry Gathering

Reno, Nevada, USA: September 20-23

GEA Honors 2015 Award Winners for Technology, Economic and Environmental Advances Announced

GEA Honors 2015 recognize companies and individuals that have made significant contributions during the past year to advancing technology, spurring economic development and protecting the environment.

Baseload Clean Energy Partners Acquires the Blue Mountain Geothermal Power Plant

AltaRock Energy's Patented stimulation Process to Be Used to Increase Power Output

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