Market Acceptance of LCPV and HCPV

Concentrator cells have been reaching increasingly impressive efficiencies, inspiring new interest in the high-efficiency, high-concentration approach. Currently, the record efficiency is 40.7 percent for a three-junction GaInP / GaInAs / Ge cell. From JX Crystals' perspective, its president Dr. Lewis M. Fraas sees the LCPV approach as fast to market with minimal risk. 'It is a simpler approach to understnd in terms of reliability and O&M because it is evolutionary from the traditional planar silicon module. Because of its simplicity, LCPV may be more suited to commercial building flat rooftops,' he recently told CPVToday.com in an interview.

Killer App for Smart Homes Energy Efficiency

The vision of the smart home has been around for decades. And an appealing vision it is - a computerized triumph of automation, controlling a house's lighting and heating, even the kitchen. Yet it has not yet caught on. What is needed is a "killer app" - a compelling use - and some government encouragement, according to Tim Woods, a partner in the consulting firm Poco Labs and an expert in smart home technology. The killer app, Mr. Woods said, will be energy efficiency.

Restaurant Generates Energy from the Deep Fryer!

Owl Power Company has announced Vegawatt, an innovative new cogeneration system for restaurants and food service facilities. Vegawatt uses waste vegetable oil from any food service operation as a fuel to generate on-site electricity and hot water, saving the restaurant thousands of dollars as well as providing a clean, renewable source of energy. Any food service location with fryers can use the Vegawatt system to save $800 monthly. It is a fully automated system that requires no intervention or maintenance by restaurant staff, no additional chemicals, and produces no liquid byproducts.

Solar Power for 7.5 cents a kilowatt-hour!

Sempra Generation, a subsidiary of Sempra Energy in San Diego, just took the wraps off a 10-megawatt solar farm in Nevada. That's small by industry standards, enough to light just 6,400 homes. But the ramifications are potentially huge. A veteran analyst has calculated that the facility can produce power at a cost of 7.5 cents a kilowatt-hour, less than the 9-cent benchmark for conventional electricity. If that's so, it marks a milestone that renewable fans have longed for: "grid parity," in which electricity from the sun, wind or other green sources can meet or beat the price performance of such carbon-based fuels as coal and natural gas. Original LA Times story.

Mapping the Solar Potential of Every Rooftop

The engineering company CH2M Hill is now joining hands with the U.S. Department of Energy to provide Internet solar maps of 25 American cities, using Google Earth technology to chart the precise solar potential of neighborhoods, literally rooftop by rooftop. The company has just finished mapping all of San Francisco, allowing residents to enter their address and take the solar measure of their own home. "People in San Francisco think we don't have any solar potential,' says Gavin Newsom, the city's deep-green mayor. "But the map shows we have a lot more sun than you'd believe." Time Magazine Source.

Top 10 Green-Tech Breakthroughs of 2008

From Wired Science - Green technology was hot in 2008. Barack Obama won the presidential election promising green jobs to Rust Belt workers. Investors poured $5 billion into the sector just through the first nine months of the year. And even Texas oilmen like T. Boone Pickens started pushing alternative energy as a replacement for fossil fuels like petroleum, coal and natural gas. Green technology and its attendant infrastructure are probably the best bet to drag the American economy out of the doldrums. So, with the optimism endemic to the Silicon Valley region, we present you with the Top 10 Green Tech Breakthroughs of 2008, alternatively titled, The Great Green Hope.

We Need a Smarter Grid!

Without a radically expanded and smarter electrical grid, wind and solar will remain niche power sources. To make use of clean energy, we'll need more transmission lines that can transport power from one region to another and connect energy-­hungry cities with the remote areas where much of our renewable power is likely to be generated. We'll also need far smarter controls throughout the distribution system--technologies that can store extra electricity from wind farms in the batteries of plug-in hybrid cars, for example, or remotely turn power-hungry appliances on and off as the energy supply rises and falls. Watch a demonstration of General Electric's software system for the grid or read more in the MIT Technology Review

Plug-in Fuel Cell Transit Bus

The City of Burbank has been selected as a national test market for a new zero-emissions, ultra-quiet prototype bus that uses a hydrogen fuel cell instead of a diesel or gasoline engine. The breakthrough vehicle will be unveiled in a spring 2009 Downtown Burbank ceremony and then go into immediate service on various routes within the City's BurbankBus network. Designed and fabricated by Colorado-based Proterra, the revolutionary vehicle can travel 250 miles before needing to be recharged, runs at double the fuel economy of a diesel bus and releases nothing but water from the engine exhaust. In addition to being created and built in this country, it relies on power that is 100% derived from U.S. sources, thereby reducing dependence on foreign energy. [read more]

49 Megawatt Solar Farm

Ecosystem Solar Electric Corp. applying for permits to build a 49 MWe Super Peaker. The Super Peaker, a Solar Thermal Electric CSP and Recovered Free Energy Technology, Integrated Storage Component Hybrid Power Plant is to be sited near Boron, a small town located in the vastness of the Southern California Mojave Desert. It will operate 24/7/365 and is estimated to produce over 290,000 megawatt-hours, sufficient to power 45,000 homes and businesses. Construction cost is estimated at $49 million, which is lower than that of a coal-fired power plant. [read more]

Alternative Energy Towers

Critical Solutions Inc. (Pink Sheets:CSLI), the designer of renewable energy tower systems, reports that the Company's Titan and MOJO systems were successfully utilized in military and emergency response exercises at the Center for National Response in West Virginia. Utilizing alternative energy power sources including solar panels, wind turbines and hydrogen fuel cells, the towers have been designed to power communications and security systems for both long term and short term requirements. Completely independent of the power grid, they eliminate the costs of trenching and physical bandwidth provisioning, are flexible to place and relocate, and easily upgraded because they utilize COTS (commercial-off-the-shelf) integrated security and communication systems. [read more]

Energy from Salt!

Instead of fossil fuels going in your gas tank, how about adding a pinch of salt? That may be the case in the future as a new process is under development to convert a type of salt into a biofuel. New properties of imidazolium salts (IMSs) could convert carbohydrates into versatile chemical compounds for biofuel production, according to a study by researchers at Singapore's Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN). Biofuels are currently the only sustainable source of liquid fuels available, but the lack of highly efficient methods to convert carbohydrates into chemical compounds for biofuel production is one reason for the slow down in any replacement of petroleum feedstock by biomass. [read more]

Incandescent - shaped CFL

The new 15-watt incandescent-shaped covered Energy Smart® CFL will appeal to people that want the energy savings and long-life performance of a GE Energy Smart® Spiral® CFL with the appearance, size and fit of a traditional incandescent bulb. The equivalent of a 60-watt incandescent bulb, the new 8,000-hour rated life CFL is guaranteed for 5 years based on 4 hours of daily use. The new covered GE Energy Smart® CFL bulb, available only from GE, debuts nationwide at Target on December 28, 2008 . Youtube video demonstration.

What Does "Green" Mean?

Nearly 90% of those responding to a new survey by the Consumer Electronics Association said environmental factors such as energy efficiency would play a role in their decision to buy their next television. But because there is no one standard about what it actually means for a product to be "green," the study shows that consumers also are confused by claims to that effect. Less than half of the 960 people surveyed said they're generally able to make sense of the environmental attributes attached to electronics on the market. Tim Herbert, the C.E.A.'s senior director of market research, said that although consumers are confused by the green credentials of various electronics, "the key takeaway is the growing importance of 'green' in consumers' purchasing decisions." [read more]

Edison's Rooftop Solar Project

Southern California Edison unveiled its newest power plant: 33,700 solar panels atop a warehouse in Fontana that will feed green energy directly into the grid. It's the first piece of what the utility says could become the largest rooftop solar installation in the world, a swath of photovoltaic panels spanning two square miles. The 600,000-square-foot warehouse rooftop, owned by ProLogis Inc., is the first of 150 commercial buildings that Edison is looking to outfit with solar panels over the next five years. Collectively, solar panels on all those roofs would provide 250 megawatts of electricity, enough by Edison's reckoning to power more than 160,000 homes when the sun is shining. Read More.

Free Energy to Charge Devices

Intel is researching technology to harvest free energy from the environment, which could lead to devices such as mobile phones running for indefinite periods without recharging. The company said it was working on tiny sensors that could capture energy from sources such as sunlight and body heat. In the future, such energy could be used to power personal electronic devices such as cell phones. Recharging themselves by scavenging free energy allows the sensors to continuously record and transmit readings over wireless networks, without any human involvement. Read more.

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Solar & Wind - Featured Product

WS510 Secondary Standard

WS510 Secondary Standard

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