Solar street lights lighting up refugee camp in Jordan

Oxfam provided Zaatari camp, in Jordan, with solar powered light to improve safety in the camp during nighttime.

Oxfam, an international confederation of 17 organizations operating in over 90 countries across the world, installed solar street lights in a refugee camp in Jordan. Zaatari refugee camp fosters over 120,000 refugees mainly from nearby Syria suffering from a major political and humanitarian crisis.

The NGO is now able to provide refugees with solar powered street lights in front of every sanitation facilities. Providing a bright light, those solar street lights can light up an entire street in the camp to ensure safety to refugees who want to go to the bathroom at nighttime.

With about 2000 new refugees arriving in the camp each day, the NGO still has many challenges to face. First priority, pointed out by the UNICEF is the access to proper water facilities. Oxfam already work on the improvement of lavatories, showers, etc. for over 20,000 refugees but much more work has to be done to provide all the camp with appropriate sanitation facilities. However, the NGO lack funds in order to develop this kind of project and with the Syria crisis still unsolved, many more refugees are expected to flee to the Jordanian camp.
To find out more on the NGO or to donate, go to http://www.oxfamamerica.org

- By Greenshine

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