Army Corps awards $7.7 million for Dugway Proving Ground solar array

The project includes installation of solar panels, inverters, transmission lines, transformers, advanced metering, controls and communications, and security measures.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. - The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento District awarded a $7,746,291 contract August 7 to TriEco-Tetra Tech Sustainable Resources Joint Venture of San Diego for installation of a two-megawatt solar photovoltaic array at Dugway Proving Ground, located in Tooele County, Utah.


The project includes installation of solar panels, inverters, transmission lines, transformers, advanced metering, controls and communications, and security measures.

When completed in fall 2015, the array will generate approximately 3,990 megawatt-hours of power annually - enough to power 540 homes.

"Rocky Mountain Power, Tooele County's main utility company, would need a major overhaul to supply the growing energy demands of Dugway Proving Ground," said Dave Simpson, the Corps' manager for the project. "This project is the first step to address impending electrical shortages and is a central element of the installation's energy security strategy."

TriEco-Tetra Tech is a U.S. Small Business Administration-designated small business. The federal government sets aside certain contract bid opportunities exclusively for small businesses.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento District provides planning, engineering, project management, environmental restoration and construction services to military and civilian customers in parts of eight western states, including California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Oregon and Wyoming.

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