Renewables sector welcomes Scottish contribution to marine energy research

Scottish Enterprise to contribute £450,000 to European research programme

Scottish Renewables has today (Thursday 2 October) welcomed the announcement that Scottish Enterprise will contribute £450,000 towards the first joint call of the Ocean Energy European Research Area Network (ERA-NET).


Lindsay Leask, Senior Policy Manager for offshore renewables at Scottish Renewables, said: "We're delighted to see Scottish Enterprise supporting the Ocean Energy European Research Area Network (ERA-NET). This investment opens up huge opportunities for Scottish companies and proves once again that Scotland is right at the heart of the increasing European interest in marine energy.

"The development of wave and tidal energy is already delivering significant economic benefit to the Scottish economy. Only last week, figures released by Scottish Renewables showed the sector has already invested more than £217m to date, and that around two thirds of the supply chain is Scottish.

"The Scottish marine energy sector has realised the best way to overcome challenges is by pooling resources and working together. Programmes like ERA-NET will help allow Scottish companies to do exactly that, by working collaboratively with partners across Europe."

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