Solar Frontier Completes Construction of the Tohoku Plant, Moves into Ramp-Up Phase

Operational testing of model CIS production plant begins

Tokyo – 2 April, 2015 – Solar Frontier, the world's largest CIS solar energy solutions company, announced today that it has completed the construction of its fourth production plant, the Tohoku Plant. The new 150 MW production plant, located in Miyagi, Japan, now moves into the ramp-up phase.


The Tohoku Plant is a cornerstone in Solar Frontier's global growth strategy. The new plant features upgrades to Solar Frontier's existing CIS production lines using advanced technology developed at its Atsugi Research Center. These will enable best-in-class production costs and new product advantages. The Tohoku Plant also serves as a model for Solar Frontier's future production plants as the company looks to expand its global production footprint. Solar Frontier will use the ramp-up phase to test and verify its latest CIS line technology, while also including new learnings during this period.

The introduction of the new plant comes as Solar Frontier works to bring its CIS technology to more customers around the world. Compared to crystalline silicon modules, CIS modules generate a higher energy yield (kilowatt-hours per kilowatt-peak) in real world conditions. The Tohoku Plant will build on the performance advantages of CIS with new product upgrades. This includes module conversion efficiencies of over 15% and adjustments to the voltage and current of its CIS thin-film modules, enabling more freedom in system design.

The Tohoku Plant's new production line is based on the proven production process at Solar Frontier's 900 MW Kunitomi Plant in southern Japan. The Tohoku Plant will enhance Solar Frontier's leadership in CIS as well as help further adoption of thin-film technology around the world.

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