Stevens Institute of Technology Wins the 2015 Solar Decathlon

Today (Oct. 19) Assistant Secretary of Energy Dr. David Danielson announced that the team from the Stevens Institute of Technology won the Department of Energy's Solar Decathlon in 2015. Competing in all 10 of the competition's challenges The New Jersey-based Stevens Institute of Technology earned 950.685 points out of a possible 1,000 to win the competition.

The Stevens SURE house was built with the mid-atlantic in mind. It was developed to withstand a hurricane and used materials repurposed from the boat-building industry. "This project was about creating a real, livable residence for families in coastal communities who will be hardest hit by the effects of climate change," said A.J. Elliott, a graduate student in the Stevens Product Architecture and Engineering program and member of the SURE HOUSE team.


In congratulating the teams for their competition, Danielson said: "On behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, thank you to each inspiring student competitor. Your hard work makes this unique competition possible. The homes you built demonstrate how affordable, renewable, and energy-saving products available today can cut energy bills, reduce pollution, and protect our climate." He added, "You have shown the skills and dedication necessary to advance renewable energy and energy efficiency throughout our economy in the decades to come."

The team from Stevens won by winning six of the competitions, tying for first for one and 2nd in the comfort zone competition. The only competitions it placed poorly in were overall affordability and energy balance—it's lowest score however, was 83 out of 100.

The University at Buffalo, The State University of New York placed second with 941.191 points, and California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo placed third with 910 points.

"This prestigious competition to build energy-efficient solar-powered homes helps students prepare for successful careers in clean energy, and I want to recognize all of these teams for their hard work and creativity," said Richard King, Director of the Solar Decathlon for the U.S. Department of Energy. "Today's results are the culmination of two years of perseverance and dedication. These students have helped demonstrate to thousands of visitors and viewers how to start saving money and energy in their own homes today."

"This incredible victory is the culmination of a two-year journey and a testament to the hard work, commitment and ingenuity of the Stevens Solar Decathlon team," said Stevens President Nariman Farvardin. "Their participation in this competition embodies the Stevens ethos to leverage science and technology education to confront some of society's biggest challenges. I could not be more proud of our students and the faculty who guided them to this outcome, and I congratulate them all on this extraordinary achievement."

This was the 7th biennial event and already the Energy Department is accepting applications for the event in 2017.

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