University of Aberdeen Invests in Electric Vehicles

ONE of Britain's oldest universities is going electric in its bid to reduce vehicle emissions on campus. The University of Aberdeen turned to Smith Electric Vehicles for an environmentally friendly solution to estates management.

ONE of Britain's oldest universities is going electric in its bid to reduce vehicle emissions on campus.

The University of Aberdeen turned to Smith Electric Vehicles for an environmentally friendly solution to estates management.
The university has bought a Smith ST100 battery powered van. It will be used in a variety of roles, from redistributing University departmental furniture and equipment, to collection of waste items from buildings on the Old Aberdeen campus to central storage areas.
Kevin Harkin, business development manager for Smith Electric Vehicles, said: "We are delighted to supply such a prestigious learning institution as Aberdeen.
"It is especially pleasing to know that electric vehicles have a place in what is the heart of Britain's oil and gas industry.
"Estates management is one of a growing number of niche markets where our ST range is thriving.
"Electric vehicles are much cheaper to run than diesel or petrol vans and are far less harmful to the environment."
David Manzie, assistant estates director for the University of Aberdeen, said: "The use of an electric vehicle for these kinds of activities is a great way of reducing the impact our fleet and University operations have on the environment.
"It is in line with the University's commitment to develop in a more sustainable way."
Smith Electric Vehicles recently launched Faraday, a van with new battery technology that aims to revolutionise the urban goods delivery sector.
The company, which is the oldest commercial electric vehicle manufacturer in the world, is already adapting the leading edge technology for other applications where emissions are an issue, such as airports and estates management.
Mr Harkin said: "Forward-thinking companies and institutions are looking for ways to reduce vehicle emissions without sacrificing performance.
"With Faraday, we can help them achieve this."
The University of Aberdeen is one of the oldest in Britain and is regarded as being at the forefront of teaching and research in medicine, the humanities and sciences.
It began as King's College in 1495, to train doctors, teachers and clergy for the communities of northern Scotland, and lawyers and administrators to serve the Scottish Crown.
ENDS

NOTES TO EDITORS
Further enquiries should be addressed to:
Aberdeen University Public Relations Office 01224 272014,
email pubrel@abdn.ac.uk

OR:
Dan Jenkins
Media Relations Manager 01207 523327
Smith Electric Vehicles
Email dan.jenkins@tanfieldgroup.com



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