Peabody to develop 1200MW clean coal power plant in China

Coal miner Peabody Energy has agreed to develop a 1,200MW power plant and a 20 million ton-per-year surface coal mine in China.

Coal miner Peabody Energy has agreed to develop a 1,200MW power plant and a 20 million ton-per-year surface coal mine in China.


The power plant, which will be fueled by a 12 million ton-per-year surface mine operated by Peabody, will be developed with China Huaneng Group and Calera Corp in the Xilinguole region of Inner Mongolia.

The energy project will include a supercritical power plant that will capture a portion of carbon dioxide (CO2) and convert it into green building materials, advancing carbon capture technology.

Huaneng will serve as the power plant operator, and Calera plans to bring its proprietary technology to convert CO2 into solid carbonates that can be used as building materials.

The clean coal power plant is expected to operate at least 30 years.

China Huaneng engages in the investment, construction, operation and management of power generation assets and the production and sale of electricity power.

Calera is a California-based company that converts carbon dioxide from fossil fuels into building materials, enabling production of clean power, cement and other products.

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