Community Green Energy helps non-profit in supporting renewable energy development.

LAKE GENEVA, Wisconsin – January 10, 2013 – For those interested in renewable energy but unable to afford the price tag, Community Green Energy (CGE) offers another way. CGE helped EcoVision Sustainable Learning Center purchase and retire 2,000 Community Green Energy RECs. This represents the attribute of two million kilowatt hours of electricity generated entirely from wind renewables—enough electricity to last EcoVision SLC a lifetime.

"This purchase is part of our mission to support the development of renewable energy," said Catherine McQueen, co-founder of EcoVision SLC. "We encourage the education and promotion of green practices, products and services including retiring RECs in honor of various associations and businesses looking to ‘green-up' their electrical usage."

All of the 2,000 Community Green Energy RECs are 100% Wind Green-e Energy Certified. By choosing to use two million kilowatt hours of renewable wind electricity over their regular electric service, EcoVision SLC has provided the environmental benefits equal to a reduction of 1,015 metric tons of CO2 greenhouse emissions—similar to the amount of CO2 emissions from the electricity use of 152 homes for one year.

Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) are the accepted way to track and trade the green attributes of renewable energy. They are seen as the "currency" of renewable electricity and green power markets. RECs allow renewable energy generators to take the environmental attributes of green energy…the greenhouse gas and pollution that is NOT emitted during generation…and sell it as a secondary product separate from the electricity itself. For every one megawatt hour of electricity they sell to a utility, they may also sell one REC. RECs are also used to provide proof of qualification for various government compliance standards and green certifications such as LEED and EPA's Green Power Partner.

Having Green-e Energy Certification ensures Community Green Energy RECs are closely monitored and verified, guaranteeing that every kilowatt hour of electricity purchased is generated from renewable resources. RECs can also come from other sources such as solar, biogas, geothermal and small hydro. EcoVision supports all types of renewable energy.

EcoVision Sustainable Learning Center promotes renewable energy, energy efficiency, green building and sustainable living through education and demonstration. Their goals are to promote and develop scalable solutions for renewable energy and sustainable development. By supporting renewable energy projects through the purchase of Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs), EcoVision SLC encourages communities to become more eco-friendly, discovering innovative ways and creating new models to make sustainable living an integral part of American life. EcoVision SLC is a Wisconsin-based non-profit corporation. For more information, call 877-248-9022

Community Green Energy develops and finances renewable energy and energy efficiency projects nationwide. Included among their many projects are community solar gardens, community choice aggregation and utility scale solar development. 262-248-0927


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