Solar Industry Supports Needed Changes to U.S. Electric Grid

Today’s grid is ancient, aging ungracefully and facing enormous challenges in the future – from meeting America’s day-to-day electricity needs to national security threats.

WASHINGTON, DC - The first-ever "Quadrennial Energy Review" was released today by the Obama administration, calling for "significant change" to America's aging energy infrastructure, including long overdue upgrades to the U.S. electric grid. In response, Ken Johnson, vice president of communications for the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA), released the following statement:


"We agree with the findings of the Quadrennial Energy Review that a top priority should be placed on modernizing America's electric grid to better accommodate renewable energy sources and the growth of distributed generation, such as rooftop solar. Today's grid is ancient, aging ungracefully and facing enormous challenges in the future - from meeting America's day-to-day electricity needs to national security threats. For renewables in particular, the grid doesn't exist in many places which offer the best solar resources -- or what infrastructure does exist is already committed to other generation sources. Simply put, new or upgraded transmission capabilities will help to move power from where it's generated to where people need it the most. Without question, dramatic changes to the grid are needed in the years ahead, and we applaud President Obama and DOE Secretary Moniz for making this important issue a national call-to-action."

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