EFFECTS OF MARINE ENERGY ON THE ENVIRONMENT

Although marine power's damage to the environment is significantly less than its energy counterparts, the possible affects to existing ecosystems must be considered.

A Wave of Excitement for UK Marine Energy Industry

Currently the UK is seen as the leader for the development of marine energy technologies. Around 10MW of wave and tidal stream devices are being tested in UK waters, more than the rest of the world combined.

Ocean Power Technologies, Inc. Announces APB350 (A1) PowerBuoy Achieves Significant Performance Milestones

Ocean Power Technologies, Inc. (Nasdaq:OPTT) today announced that its APB350 (A1) PowerBuoy® has achieved several significant milestones. Total cumulative deployment time has exceeded 125 days and energy generated has surpassed 1,000 kWh (1MWh).

Eco Wave Power Receives EU Funding Approval for Wave Energy Power Plant in Gibraltar

An Announcement made by EWP earlier today confirms a European Union grant for Eco Wave Power's wave energy Project in Gibraltar.

Tidal power: An inside look at how it works

From EnergyDigital:  Tidal power, a sister resource to wind, takes advantage of the predictability of the ocean tides to generate electricity, either via estuary barges or directly from the currents themselves via tidal streams. According to the Ocean Energy Council, the ideal area to net the most potential power is an area with a tidal range of at least seven meters. Energy can be generated via floating devices that drive hydraulic pumps, oscillating water columns within cylindrical shafts to create air movement, or hydropower turbines. The Pacific Northwest coast of the United States is an excellent location for tidal power, given its broad range of tide movement. According to Renewable Northwest, some areas of potential development include: • Makah Bay, Washington (by AquaEnergy Group) • Newport, Oregon (by Oregon State University / Oregon Department of Energy) • Tacoma Narrows (by Tacoma Power) • Puget Sound (by Snohomish County Public Utility District) The following sites are under development in Wales due to their wide tidal height variation and economically receptive marketplace: • Swansea Bay (by Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay) • St. Asaph (by North Wales Tidal Energy & Costal Protection) As a whole, the UK has the potential for over 11,000 MW, a staggering amount given the relatively small landmass of the country. This makes it the single largest source of hydrokinetic power in Europe, enough theoretically support 10 percent of the world’s energy consumption.   Cont'd...

How a Manmade Tidal Lagoon Could Change the Future of Clean Energy

FEARGUS O'SULLIVAN for CityLab:  Just outside the Welsh city of Swansea, the U.K. is planning one of the most innovative power plants ever constructed. It’s not the plant’s size that is striking, though it could ultimately provide power to 155,000 homes for 120 years. It’s the source of its power that breaks ground: tides channeled into an artificially constructed lagoon. Granted full planning permission this June, the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon will be the world’s first ever plant to generate electricity using this method. Should it prove successful, the plant’s template could be adopted worldwide as a way of generating green power while simultaneously providing sea wall protection to coastal communities.   Cont'd...

Natural Power and SeaRoc collaborate for EDF's Paimpol-Brhat Tidal Farm

The two companies have joined forces and been awarded a contract by EDF France to develop the Paimpol-Brehat Tidal Farm.

How floating turbines could harness the awesome power of the tides

Ross Jennings for The Conversation:  The world’s tides contain enough energy to power the entire UK’s electricity consumption. And, since it effectively harnesses the moon’s constant and predictable gravitational pull, tidal power overcomes one of renewable energy’s classic problems – the fact you never know quite how much sun, wind or rain to expect. Now, underwater windmills positioned just below the ocean surface could be a major breakthrough for tidal power. Costly technology and inaccessible locations have thus far held things back. Large, heavy and expensive turbines mounted on the seabed have been developed, but these are aimed at commercial scale developments. Tidal power needs its equivalent of the rooftop solar panel. Imagine then a wind turbine, but underwater, and not fixed to the seabed – these so-called “mobile floating turbines” are a cheaper and more adaptable alternative to big, fixed developments. Most floating turbines look something like this:   Cont'd...

Eco Wave Power Raises 2 Million USD in First Round of Fundraising

"This new investment is a vote of confidence in Eco Wave Power's technology, our team, and the global market potential of onshore wave energy."

Twenty Teams Advancing to Next Phase of the Wave Energy Prize

Qualified Teams to Continue Pursuit to Win U.S. Department of Energy's Prize Challenge

WavePOD project secures £2 million from Wave Energy Scotland

The WavePOD (Wave Power Offtake Device) aims to develop a standardised subsea unit which can be attached to a variety of different wave energy machines and convert the movement of the device into electricity.

British energy firms turning the tides with Canada

Five British companies are celebrating today after they have received grant funding from the Government's innovation experts at Innovate UK to develop tidal energy projects with Canadian businesses and universities.

Green light for world's first tidal lagoon

Natural Power has been working alongside Tidal Lagoon Power on the Swansea Bay project - the world's first tidal lagoon - which was granted planning permission last month.

Northwest Energy Innovations Launches Wave Energy Device in Hawai'i

First Grid Connected Wave Energy Device in the U.S. to be Independently Evaluated

Cape Sharp Tidal Partners Award First Contracts to Nova Scotian Companies

Cape Sharp Tidal is a joint venture between Emera Inc. and OpenHydro.

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