RES Selected to Construct Comanche Solar Project

Pueblo, Colorado-based facility will be the largest east of the Rocky Mountains and will power more than 30,000 homes

BROOMFIELD, Colo., Aug. 20, 2015 -- Renewable Energy Systems (RES), a leader in the development, engineering, and construction of wind, solar, transmission, and energy storage projects in the Americas, is pleased to announce it has been selected by the world's largest renewable energy developer, SunEdison, to construct the 156 megawatt (MWdc) Comanche Solar project located seven miles southeast of Pueblo, Colo. RES will install the plant's balance of systems.


Developed by SunEdison, the facility will generate more than 300 gigawatt-hours of energy a year for the customers of Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCo), a subsidiary of Xcel Energy. The project will utilize photovoltaic technology equipped with single axis trackers, following the sun's path to optimize production.

PSCo, which services more than 1.4 million customers, will purchase electricity generated by the solar power plant under a 25-year power purchase agreement (PPA) with SunEdison. The PPA was awarded through an open solicitation in which Comanche Solar was selected over other sources of energy, including natural gas.

Comanche Solar will be the second renewable energy project constructed by RES in Colorado, where the company is headquartered. In 2011, RES built the 250 MW Cedar Point wind facility located in Limon, 80 miles outside of Denver.

"RES is pleased to continue our working relationship with SunEdison as one of their Solar Alliance group of companies. Colorado has consistently demonstrated leadership in renewable energy and Comanche Solar advances that legacy. Together we are creating jobs, reducing emissions and delivering economic benefits to local communities," said Andrew Fowler, Chief Operating officer of RES.

"SunEdison and RES are teaming up to build the largest solar facility in Colorado and the biggest east of the Rockies. This project will deliver clean energy to Colorado homes and businesses at a competitive price, and is an excellent proof point demonstrating that we can support the Administration's Clean Power Plan with cost-competitive, solar technology," said Paul Gaynor, Executive Vice President of SunEdison's EMEA & Americas business unit.

The Comanche Solar Project is expected to be completed during the first quarter of 2016.

About RES
Since 1997, RES has been providing development, engineering, construction, and operations services to the utility-scale wind, solar, transmission, and energy storage markets across the Americas. The company employs more than 500 full-time professionals and has over 8,000 MW of utility-scale renewable energy and energy storage projects and constructed more than 650 miles of transmissions lines throughout the U.S., Canada, and Chile. RES' corporate office in Canada is located in Montreal, Quebec with regional offices located in Oakville, Ontario.

RES has developed and/or built over 10 GW of renewable energy capacity worldwide, has an asset management portfolio exceeding 1 GW, and is active in a range of renewable technologies including onshore wind, solar, energy storage, transmission, and demand side management.

For more information, visit www.res-americas.com.

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