With a sudden burst of momentum, where do we take the next step in 2008? Production and delivery will be key. Many future car enthusiasts were promised new technologies only to be burned with failures of delivery in the manufacturing facilities. Cost efficient fuel is a must. Build a better battery and they will come.

PAVING THE WAY FOR CARS OF THE FUTURE

| Future Cars

EarthToys Renewable Energy Article
With a sudden burst of momentum, where do we take the next step in 2008? Production and delivery will be key. Many future car enthusiasts were promised new technologies only to be burned with failures of delivery in the manufacturing facilities. Cost efficient fuel is a must. Build a better battery and they will come.
2007: Paving the Way for Cars of the Future

Future Cars


2007 was an interesting year, to say the least, for the automotive industry. We saw crude oil approach the 100 dollar per barrel mark as U.S. average gas prices hovered around 3 dollars for most of the year. This dark time actually yielded a light for the future of the automobile.

For the first time in years, consumers lashed out against the big and yearned for the small and compact – mpgs were the talk of the town. Most car categories posted declines in sales, where as small, compact and hybrids saw sales boom. Toyota sales increased by 71% for the Prius with global unit sales topping 400,000. Green also ruled the airwaves. GM and Ford touted advertisements with hybrids available in every class as well as promises of a greener, cleaner automobile. Chevy even hyped up the electric Volt, which is set to release only in 2010.

We also saw the emergence of another type of entity in 2007: the startup. Tesla Motors’ electric Roadster proved to be a giant leap forward in the realm of electric cars and auto transportation in general. With its sleek beauty, advanced technology and fuel efficiency, the Roadster laid the groundwork for a potential overhaul of the industry.


Tesla Roadster

Aptera, based out of Southern California, debuted the Typ-1e at 300mpg and a sticker price of under $30,000.

Aptera Typ-1

We also saw more and more hype around the future of sky cars (Moller M400), compressed air cars (MDI Air Cars) as well as hydrogen fuel cell cars and solar cars.


Moller M400 Skycar


MDI Air Car

With a sudden burst of momentum, where do we take the next step in 2008? Production and delivery will be key. Many future car enthusiasts were promised new technologies only to be burned with failures of delivery in the manufacturing facilities. Cost efficient fuel is a must. Build a better battery and they will come. All this said, we are poised to wean ourselves away from the grips of the internal combustion engine. Make no mistake, the changes will be slow, but at least 2007 was a big step in the right direction.

For more information on alternative automobiles and energies, please visit Future Cars.

 
The content & opinions in this article are the author’s and do not necessarily represent the views of AltEnergyMag

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