Proterra Announces the Largest-Ever U.S. Order of Altoona-Tested Electric Buses

Current Proterra customer Foothill Transit to buy 12 new buses to fully electrify a major route

IREC Applauds Hawaiian Utility for Easing Access to Solar Power

Since 2010, IREC has been collaborating extensively with Hawaiian utilities and stakeholders on interconnection reform.

President Obama shows interest in fuel cell stack from PowerCell

Cleantech in focus during state visit to Sweden

TALCO AND WIND ANALYTICS JOIN FORCES FOR AFFORDABLE WIND ENERGY

United Wind Company President Reveals New Wind Project Financing Model at RETECH 2013

Genscape Reports Renewable Generation Has Lowest Output of the Year in August; YTD Power Demand Drops Below 2012 Levels

Coal generation down near five-year lows during July & August; Weak summer demand due to cooler Midwest & East Coast

Finance Firm Sees Wind, Solar Cost Plunge

Renewable energy advocates have long argued that subsidies for wind, solar and other forms of clean power would eventually drive down their costs and allow them to be competitive with conventional, dirty energy (itself often subsidized). It looks like they could be right – to an unexpected degree. An analysis by financial advisory and asset management firm Lazard has found that the levelized cost of energy from wind power has plunged by more than 50 percent in the past four years. “While many had anticipated significant declines in the cost of utility-scale solar PV, few anticipated these sorts of cost declines for wind technology,” the report said. Wind isn’t the only clean energy technology making remarkable progress, according to the Lazard analysis. Solar is on a winning trend as well: The current and anticipated costs of all forms of utility-scale solar PV continue to decline;  the study estimates that the LCOE of leading technologies has fallen by more than 50 percent in the last four years. Utility-scale solar PV is a competitive source of peak energy as compared with conventional generation in many parts of the world, without any subsidies (appreciating the important qualitative differences related to dispatch characteristics and other factors).

Output from green power drops in Canada

Federal statistics show that the contribution from renewable energy sources continues to decline, compared with conventional carbon-based fuel sources.

Growing US Solar Market for the second quarter of 2013

Solarbuzz published its North America PV Markets quarterly report and results are good. For the second quarter of the year, our solar capacity increased with an addition of 976MW.

iSolar Exchange Offers Private Sales Exchange Networks to Connect Solar Buyers & Sellers Online

The iSolar Exchange online marketplace is designed to create a secure site that connects the entire supply, manufacture, and delivery channels for solar and renewable energy products and services - worldwide.

SolarWorld appeals two trade-case findings to Court of International Trade in New York

Appeals could significantly raise import duties for many Chinese solar producers

Solar-cell manufacturing costs: innovation could level the field

It’s widely believed that China is the world’s dominant manufacturer of solar panels because of its low labor costs and strong government support. But a new study by researchers at MIT and the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) shows that other factors are actually more significant — suggesting that the United States could once again become cost-competitive in photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing. As of 2011, manufacturers in China accounted for 63 percent of all solar-panel production worldwide. But a detailed analysis of all costs associated with PV production shows that the main contributors to that country’s lower PV prices are economies of scale and well-developed supply chains — not cheap labor. “We developed a bottom-up model,” explains Tonio Buonassisi, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at MIT and a co-author of the new report, just published in the journal  Energy and Environmental Science . The researchers estimated costs for virtually all the materials, labor, equipment and overhead involved in the PV manufacturing process.  “We added up the costs of each individual step,” he says, providing an analysis that’s “very rigorous, it’s down in the weeds. It doesn’t rely solely on self-reported figures from manufacturers’ quarterly reports. We really took great care to make sure our numbers were representative of actual factory costs.”

AXEON Introduces New Integrated Solutions Platform

Leading water treatment manufacturer launches new program to streamline offering with easier product identification and selection

The Geothermal Resources Council Announces 2013 Amateur Photo Contest Entries

The 34th Amateur Photo Contest winners will be announced at the GRC Annual Meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA.

Ballard Engineering Services Programs Driving Value Creation in Development Stage Markets

Ballard Power Systems confirms that a range of Engineering Services programs currently underway are expected to generate significant value for the Company and its shareholders.

TGEP company in Illinois becomes exclusive distributor for clipper creek chargers

TGEP located in Crest Hill, IL was picked up by Clipper Creek to there exclusive distributor for the Midwest region. TGEP will provide discounted rates for installing the EV chargers

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