Solar Power's Promise Infuses a New Film

Emily J. Gertz for TakePart:  Filmmaker Shalini Kantayya set out to show that climate change isn’t all gloom and doom. The result, Catching the Sun, ably makes that case but may still leave you inspired and infuriated in equal parts. This fast-paced and compelling new documentary, which premieres Friday in New York City and in cities nationwide during April, follows a diverse group of job seekers, activists, politicians, and entrepreneurs as they tap into the world’s growing solar powereconomy. Kantayya jumps between nations that have unequivocally adopted policies to speed up adoption of renewables and more fitful efforts here in the United States to expand solar energy—from a program in Richmond, Virginia, training unemployed men and women to become solar panel installers to a “Green Tea Party” member and energy independence advocate working both sides of the halls of power in Georgia.   Cont'd...

The World's Largest Renewable Energy Developer Could Go Broke

Ben Walsh for The Huffington Post:  There is a “substantial risk” that SunEdison may file for bankruptcy, the world’s largest renewable energy developer said in a regulatory filing on Tuesday. The company’s fall isn’t a referendum on the solar industry as a whole, as much as it is on SunEdison’s aggressive growth strategy fueled by excessive debt and financial engineering, analysts say. SunEdison “just thought they were smarter than everyone else,” said David Levine, the founder and CEO of Geostellar,  a solar energy marketplace that has done deals with the company. The company’s shares have fallen steeply since they hit a high of $30 in July. They were at just $1.26 before the filing. The stock immediately dropped another 40 percent when the market opened after the filing, and the company was trading at just $0.59 by Tuesday lunchtime. “What happened from late-2014 to the middle of 2015, the company began embarking on a hyper-growth strategy,” S&P analyst Angelo Zino told The Huffington Post.   Cont'd...

Panasonic Continues To Innovate HIT® Technology In Their PV Panels

Panasonic HIT® panels recently set a world record for conversion efficiency at the research level (laboratory), a full percentage point increase over the previous record.

Lithium-Ion Energy Storage for PV System in Puerto Rico

Li-ion solutions are both scalable and flexible in their power-to-energy ratio. The flexibility enables MTR-type solutions for high-power smoothing, medium-power options for shaping renewable output to meet a forecast, and high-energy systems for shifting of renewable energy to periods of peak load.

Bi-Partisan Support Driving Solar Energy Development

Each political party strives to differentiate itself in terms of platform and policy. Liberals tend to emphasize environmental aspects of solar and renewable energy, while conservatives like to encourage market forces for job creation and consumer choice. Both of these are great reasons to support solar, and that is why we see an opportunity for bipartisan support of this technology.

Why Power Markets Tilt Toward Renewables Even With Cheap Oil

Anna Hirtenstein for Bloomberg Business:  If you’re a power plant developer, chances are you’ll be selling renewables in a developing nation in the decades ahead -- even with fossil fuel prices bumping along historic lows. That’s been the conclusion for some time of the International Energy Agency and independent researchers such as Bloomberg New Energy Finance. A report out Thursday from the United Nations Environment Program using BNEF data gives more statistical backing for the trends. For the first time in 2015, more investment went into renewables than fossil fuels, and most of the money went to emerging markets. BNEF is hosting a conference in New York starting April 4 to bring together executives and bankers attempting to generate value from the boom. Here are six charts from the UNEP report showing why cheap oil and natural gas aren’t about to slow the rise of wind and solar.

Newly Built Concentrated Solar Power Plants - Time To Consider Flushing and Cleaning as an Industry Standard?

A recent research paper published in Applied Thermal Engineering highlights the importance of defined protocols to effectively flush and clean newly built facilities, which is needed prior to filling the system with expensive fluids, such as solar thermal fluids.

EPFL Scientists Achieve Record-Level Reproducibility for Perovskite Solar Cells

Perovskite solar cells hold much promise for cost-effective solar energy. However, heat stability is an issue, and can significantly limit the solar cell’s long-term efficiency. A team of scientists led by Michael Grätzel’s lab at EPFL has now developed a cesium-containing perovskite solar cell that has achieved efficiency of 21.1%, as well as record-level reproducibility. The work is published in Energy and Environmental Science. By adding cesium, the EPFL scientists, led by postdoc Michael Saliba, made the first ever triple-cation perovskite mixture (Cs/MA/FA). The new films are more heat-stable and less affected by fluctuating surrounding variables such as temperature, solvent vapors or the heating protocol used for the device. But more importantly, they also show stabilized power-conversion efficiencies of 21.1% and outputs at 18% under operational conditions, even after 250 hours. “This is an absolute breakthrough,” says Michael Saliba. “These properties are crucial for commercializing perovskite photovoltaics, especially since reproducibility and stability are the main requirements for cost-effective large-scale manufacturing of perovskite solar cells.”   Source AZOCleantech...

Solar Panels Grown on the Moon could Power Earth

Sarah Fecht for Popular Science:  Currently a high school senior in California, Lewis-Weber has just published a paper in the journal New Space with what he thinks could be the solution to the upcoming energy crisis: putting self-replicating solar panels in space. These solar panels would to build copies of themselves, autonomously, on the surface of the moon. Then they would enter Earth's orbit, collect the sun's energy, and wirelessly beam it to the ground. That may sound like a crazy idea, but the notion of space-based solar power actually dates back several decades, to the 1970s oil crisis. It was set aside after oil prices went back down, but since then, two things have happened: One, the world has become a lot more desperate to solve climate change; and two, technological innovations have brought this crazy idea out of the realm of science fiction. The idea is gaining attention, and with some big investments, it's possible that space-based solar power could become a reality within a few decades.   Cont'd...

Obama administration opens up Long Island to offshore wind development

SCOTT WALDMAN for Politico :  The federal government has designated an 81,000-acre area off of Long Island for possible commercial offshore wind development. The move by the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management on Wednesday to open the federal waters 11 miles off of New York to major wind development projects will be a significant boost to the Cuomo administration’s aggressive climate policies. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management will now conduct an environmental assessment, with a possible sale of leases to follow. “New York has tremendous offshore wind potential, and today's milestone marks another important step in the President's strategy to tap clean, renewable energy from the Nation’s vast wind and solar resources,” U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell said in a statement. “We will continue to work with the State and local stakeholders through a collaborative effort as we determine what places have the highest potential and lowest conflict to harness the enormous wind energy potential off the Atlantic seaboard.”   Cont'd...

The world's first solar airport no longer pays for electricity

Jethro Mullen for CNN:  Fed up with their hefty electricity bill, managers at Cochin International Airport in southern India took matters into their own hands. Three years ago, they began adding solar panels -- first on the roof of the arrivals terminal, then on and around an aircraft hangar. The success of those initial efforts led to a much bigger endeavor. "We wanted to be independent of the electricity utility grid," Jose Thomas, the airport's general manager, told CNNMoney. Last year, the airport commissioned the German company Bosch to build a vast 45-acre solar plant on unused land near the international cargo terminal. The plant came online in August, making Cochin the world's first fully solar-powered airport. The tens of thousands of panels generate on average slightly more than the roughly 48,000-50,000 kilowatts of power that the airport -- the seventh busiest in India -- uses per day, according to Thomas. Surplus energy is fed into the wider electricity grid. The big project cost around 620 million rupees ($9.3 million), a sum the airport expects to save in less than six years by not having to pay electricity bills anymore. It also estimates the solar plant will avoid more than 300,000 metric tons of carbon emissions from coal power over the next 25 years.   Cont'd...

The Potential of Battery Storage Solutions for Domestic and Commercial PV Installations

The developments in battery storage systems being launched to the UK market this year will help to distribute energy more efficiently, and with the PV market in a state of flux following the reductions in the tariff rates, the battery storage developments should provide some stability to the trade.

GE has figured out how to make solar power batteries using greenhouse gasses

Brad Reed for BGR:  We typically think of carbon dioxide as an unhealthy byproduct of our over reliance on fossil fuels. But what if CO2 could be used to help us move away from fossil fuels and toward renewable energy sources? GE Global Research has been working with the U.S. Department of Energy to come up with a way to use excess carbon dioxide produced by power plants to store extra solar power and deliver it back to the grid for later use. There are two major components to this solar power storage system: The first component captures solar energy and keeps it stored in molten salt, while the second component takes surplus electricity from the grid to cool off carbon dioxide to the point where it becomes dry ice. To keep the solar energy stored, the molten salt will then be released into the CO2, which will act as a battery capable of deploying power when needed. The CO2-molten salt mixture will then flow through a specially designed CO2 turbine that GE says “can generate as much as 100 megawatts of ‘fast electricity’ per installed unit.” The advantage of this system is that these turbines would be able to operate at night when there’s no solar power being directly absorbed.   Cont'd...

Interview with Michael Wiener of SolarRoofHook.com

In general, the installer just removes the roof piece, locates the rafters, drills pilot holes, fastens the product to the rafter, properly seals the penetration, and grinds the tile where the mount is located before placing the roof piece back over or around the mount.

Solar Thermal Fluid Sampling: Personal Safety and System Design Considerations

Managing fluids at high temperatures presents a safety hazard as the fluid may come into contact with the engineer whilst the fluid is being sampled

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